News News
Back

The legal framework for international co-productions

European Audiovisual Observatory releases new European film report
Strasbourg 29/01/2019
  • Diminuer la taille du texte
  • Augmenter la taille du texte
  • Imprimer la page
  • Imprimer en PDF
The legal framework for international co-productions

Download it here

Recent European Audiovisual Observatory figures on European film co-productions suggest that these films travel better than their purely national counterparts. They cross borders and reach more international audiences. But entering into a co-production can be a risky business indeed, and just like a bad marriage, end in a messy and painful divorce! So what are the legal safeguards? What frameworks exist to lay some basic ground rules for co-productions in Europe? Just ahead of the Berlinale, the Strasbourg-based Observatory, part of the Council of Europe, has released its latest report: The legal framework for international co-productions.

The background statistics are provided in chapter one of this new report. The number of majority co-productions rose by 43% between 2007 and 2016. Overall, 20% of all EU films produced during this period were co-productions. The authors set the scene by providing key data on the number, admissions and circulation of co-productions in this first chapter.

Chapter two draws a panoramic picture of international support funds in and beyond Europe. The importance of being considered European is emphasised, making it possible for a film to benefit from EU broadcast and VoD quotas under the Audiovisual Media Services Directive. The very first international co-production treaty: the Council of Europe’s Convention on Cinematographic Co-production functions via a points system that allows a film to be defined as European and therefore access the benefits of the Convention. The Convention was created in 1992 and revised in 2017 to include technological and economic developments in the film world. The authors also detail the functioning of the Council of Europe’s Eurimages, EU’s MEDIA sub-programme and the Nordisk film and TV Fond as major sources of funding for European co-productions. Going beyond Europe, the report touches on international co-production treaties such as the Ibero-American Co-production Agreement which brings together certain Latin American Countries and Spain, for example.

Chapter three zooms in on the various bilateral or multilateral co-production agreements currently in existence and provides a very useful run-down of common features of these. Such agreements can define important working parameters such as the minimal financial contribution of each producer, methods of sharing rights, revenues and prizes, and place of filming, pre-and post-production, for example. This chapter also lists the various international schemes which bring together national public funds to foster co-development and co-production of film projects. These include the German-Italian co-production project set up by the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage Activities and the German FFA.

Chapter four provides an absolutely invaluable checklist of points to be included in any watertight co-production contract. Any producer considering entering into a coproduction would do well to compare the features outlined in this chapter with their contract with the advice contained in this chapter as it is extremely concrete and practical.

Chapter five provides an illuminating analysis of some famous film co-production legal disputes, including Terry Gilliam’s famous “The man who killed Don Quixote” which was the subject of a rights ownership quarrel last year.

The concluding chapter six takes up some of the state of play reflections on co-production made at the European Audiovisual Observatory’s Cannes co-production conference last year. The Observatory’s panellists mention the various challenges of international co-production, in particular for smaller markets such as Austria or Belgium.

International film co-production – the state of play outlined in this new publication!


observatory 2019 advent calendar observatory 2019 advent calendar

From 1st until 24th December click on the relevant date to reveal an Observatory surprise!

 

Featured database Featured database

MAVISE database for TV, VOD services and their licences.

MAVISE, our free access database provides information on television channels, on-demand services and licences in 41 European countries and in Morocco.
Find the licensing country and owners of audiovisual services available in Europe. Create lists of services in Europe based on your criteria. Explore the European registries of licences, and download your search results.

Access it here                                                             

FEATURED PUBLICATION FEATURED PUBLICATION

The independence of media regulatory authorities in Europe

Europe’s main piece of media legislation – the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) – was recently revised and a new version entered into force.
The Observatory has a vigilant eye on European media legislation and has released, with the aid of its partner institution, the University of Amsterdam's IViR, an analysis of what the new AVMSD will mean for European regulators.

Acccess it here

Online database Online database


Studies and data from the European film agencies
Shop Shop

  Focus 2019 - World Film
  Market Trends

  Electronic version: 33 €

  Order it

 

Events and diary Events and diary

Visit our Events page for up to date details of Observatory events, plus information on events attended by our talented team.

Click here

OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

If you want to stay informed, make sure you receive our monthly “wrap-up” newsletter and information about our latest free publications.

To join our mailing list:

email Alison Hindhaugh

Or telephone on:
  + 33 (0) 3 90 21 60 10 (direct)

Follow us on Social Media Follow us on Social Media

        

  Watch our videos